Copyright © 2001 & 2002 John C. Loring

 

1 tabako

2 kiseru

3 bon

4 ensem

5 tsutsu

6 ire

7 net

8 gloss

9 bib

 Return To Collection

 

Glossary

(note: in this paper and glossary I have used spellings found in previous articles, however in many cases, some noted below, it is questionable whether those transliterations are the best choices)

 

aikuchi-zutsu  -- a two part tsutsu which when closed appears to have a uniformly wide top and bottom.

 

bokuto – a ‘doctor’s’ sword made of wood and used as a defensive weapon.

 

daimyo – lord, but also the nick name for kiziami-tabako from Mito.

 

date – dandies.

 

date-kiseru – alternatively a nickname for nobe-kiseru or very long rao-kiseru carried by a man, i.e. a ‘dandy’, resting on his sholder.

 

do – the metal shank of a nobe-kiseru, the equivalent of the rao of a rao-kiseru (‘do’ might be better spelled ‘doh’).

 

fukuro-monoya – a pouch and purse maker and the general contractor charged with putting together a personal smoking ensemble.

 

gankubi –‘gooseneck’, specifically  the curve under the hizara, but often  hizara  and gankubi are used interchangeably (I have seen gankubi spelled ganbuki in one article but since that latter ‘word’ apparently has no meaning in Japanese I assume the spelling was in error). 

 

ganpi – a tsutsu made of tightly twisted lacquered paper appearing to be woven cane or bamboo (ganpishi may be the better spelling.)

 

giyamono --  a nobe-kiseru made of glass, (giyaman may be the better spelling).

 

goten  --   a style of either a rao-kiseru with bulbous kata  or of nobe-kiseru with an even flowing, thinnish, linear do.

 

haifuki – a container on a tabako-bon to hold ash and waste, hai-otoshi, haifuki or togeppoh are  interchangeable but the latter two are more commonly used today.

 

hai-otoshi – a container on a tabako-bon to hold ash and waste, hai-otoshi, haifuki or togeppoh are interchangeable but the latter two are more commonly used today.

 

hakogaki – box for objects such as a personal smoking ensemble, upon which there is a third party certification of the artists who made or decorated the objects in the box.

 

hanami, -- a picnic outing during cherry blossom season.

 

hana-mi-kiseru – a very long kiseru carried by women on their shoulder to a hanami,  (hana-mi-kiseru is probably better spelled hana-mi-giseru).

 

hibachi – a container for holding burning charcoal.

 

hi-ire – a small hibachi found on tabako-bon.

 

himo – the cord used to string together sageimono including the various parts of a personal smoking ensemble.

 

hiuchi-bako – a metal walnut shaped netsuke containing a flint lock lighting mechanism.

 

hiuchi-bukuro – a flint case.

 

hizara – the metal bowl of a kiseru, often the terms hizara and gankubi are used interchangeably to refer to the bowl. 

 

inro –  a multi, stacked, drawer sagemono, used for carry seals and medicine.   

 

jingasa --  a traditional soldier hat.

 

joshin -- a style of rao-kiseru with paneled kata or a style of nobe-kiseru with a rectangular do.

 

kaban – shop signs.

 

kabuto --  a samurai battle helmet.

 

kagamibuta – a manju style netsuke in the shape of a bowl with a metal lid over the bowl opening.

 

kanagu or kanamono – a three part metal clasp closure system for a tobako-ire.

 

kanamono or kanagu – a three part metal clasp closure system for a tobako-ire.

 

kanseinui – the cover flap of a tabako-ire.

 

kata --  the metal shanks of a rao-kiseru hizara or suikuchi.

 

katabori – a three dimensionally carved netsuke.

 

kau-bon – an incense tray, which served as a model for the first tabako-bon.  Prior to the 19th century tabako-bon were referred to as kau-bon in some parts of Japan.

 

kau-ro – the incense burner on a kau-bon.

 

kawarigata – a kiseru of unusual design.

 

kenka-kiseru – a kiseru that may also serve as a weapon.

 

kimono – robe, the principal traditional clothing, typically worn with an obi waistband.

 

kinchaku – a money purse.

 

kiseru – a traditional Japanese pipe.

 

kiseru-zutsu – a case for a kiseru, i.e. a pipe case.

 

kizami-tabako  --  dry, finely shredded tobacco smoked in a kiseru.

 

kodai-ji -- a style of rao-kiseru with bulbous kata (also, gotten ).

 

kodo – the incense ceremony, the tray for which was the initial model for the tabako-bon.

 

koshizashi tabako-ire – a principal personal smoking ensemble wherein a kiseru-zutsu is used to anchor the

ensemble in lieu of a netsuke.

 

koyori – a twist of paper or rice straw used to clean a kiseru.

 

kurawa – or suigaraake, an ‘ashtray’ netsuke (suigaraaki is probably better spelled suigara-oke).

 

manju – a flatish oval netsuke.

 

memochi – a women’s tabako-ire personal smoking ensemble.

 

menuki – metal sword furniture sometimes used as an omote kanagu.

 

meotokiseru --  a kawarigata with a single bowl and two stems meeting at the bowl to form a /\.

 

mokugyo --  a Buddhist gong.

 

muso-zutsu – a two part telescoping tsutsu.

 

nagato-zutsu – a tsutsu made of lacquered woven cane or bamboo or of ganpi.

 

namban giseru – supposedly a very early long  rao-kiseru with a distinctive hook shaped hizara kata.  No examples of this style pipe have ever been found and it is most likely that it is nothing more then a 16th century Japanese artist’s confusion of Portuguese artifacts.

 

natamame – a style of nobe-kiseru with a flat do.

 

netsuke – a toggle tied to himo at one end of a sagemono ensemble in order to prevent the himo from slipping out from behind the obi.

 

netsuke-shi – a carver of netsuke.

 

nobe-kiseru -- one of the two basic styles of kiseru, a nobe-kiseru shank is not made of bamboo or wood (nobe-kiseru might be better spelled nobe-giseru).

 

obi – the waist band worn around the kimono.

 

ojime – small object generally round with a single hole drilled through and through which the himo is threaded, 

used to keep himo together and tight in a sagemono ensemble such as a personal smoking ensemble.

 

omote kanagu – the usually decorated part of the kanagu or kanamono  on the outside of the kanseinui.

 

otoshi-zutsu – a one piece tsutsu with an open top.

 

rao --  the bamboo or wood shank of a rao-kiseru.

 

rao-kiseru – one of the two basic styles of kiseru, a rao-kiseru has a bamboo or wood shank (rao-kiseru might be better spelled rao-giseru).

 

raoya – a street peddler who cleaned and repaired kiseru.

 

sagemono – objects, general cases of some sort, hung from a man’s obi via a himo anchored by a netsuke.

 

sage tabako-ire – a principal personal smoking ensemble style wherein a netsuke anchors the ensemble.

 

sanchu-kizamimountain tobacco, the nickname for kizami-tabako grown in Mimasaka.

 

senryu-zutsu  -- a one piece, open tsutsu that holds the hizara  a ‘lock’ and the suikuchi in a ring.

 

sekishu – a style of rao-kiseru with gently rounded kata.

 

shiyo-in tabako-bon – a large kau-bon style tabako-bon used on occasions of ceremony.

 

shokunin – an artisan.

 

suigaraake – or kurawa, an ‘ashtray’ netsuke (suigaraaki is probably better spelled suigara-oke).

 

suikuchi – the metal mouthpiece of a kiseru.

 

tabako-bon – a tray, box or chest used to hold smoking accessories.

 

tabako-dansu – a chest style tabako-bon.

 

tabako-ire – a soft sided tobacco carry, although prior to the mid 20th century the term may have encompassed all tobacco carries.

 

taki-gara-ire – the ash and waste receptacle on a kau-bon.

 

tamagawa -- a style of rao-kiseru with tubular kata.

 

tatohgami, -- a folded paper pouch used to sell, carry and store kizami-tabako, today the term tatohshi is more commonly used.

 

tatohshi  --  the term used today, in preference to tatohgami, for a folded paper pouch used to sell, carry and store kizami-tabako.

 

tazunagate – a style of nobe-kiseru with a twisted, rope like, do, (tazunagata may be the better spelling).

 

teppo-zutsu – a gun disguised to appear like a otoshi-zutsu.

 

togeppoh – a container on a tabako-bon to hold ash and waste, hai-otoshi, haifuki or togeppoh are interchangeable but the latter two are more commonly used today.

 

tomobako -- box for objects such as a personal smoking ensemble, signed by the artists who made or decorated the objects in the box.

 

tomozutsu –  a personal smoking ensemble, where the kiseru-zutsu and tobacco carry are made out of the same material and decoration.

 

tonkotsu – a hard sided tobacco carry, this term may only have come into use in the 20th century.

 

tsuba --  with reference to a 17th or 18th century kiseru, a removable guard that fits midway on the rau  or do and acts as a pipe rest.

 

tsutsu  -- a short hand reference to a kiseru-zutsu, i.e. a pipe case.

 

uraza  -- the occasionally  decorated part of the kanagu or kanamono  on the inside of the kanseinui.

 

wari-zutsu – a one piece tsutsu with an open top but slit sides that act to hold the kiseru from falling out.


 

1 tabako

2 kiseru

3 bon

4 ensem

5 tsutsu

6 ire

7 net

8 gloss

9 bib

 Return To Collection

Copyright © 2001 & 2002 John C. Loring